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Published: Monday, 2/10/2014 - Updated: 8 months ago

County officials eye safer trail use

Sylvania-Metamora route not continuous

BY NATALIE TRUSSO CAFARELLO
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Although used by bikers and walkers alike, the multiuse trail that runs along Sylvania-Metamora Road is not continuous. The Sylvania-Metamora Path’s 2.25 miles between Kilburn and Centennial roads, mostly in Sylvania Township but partly in the city of Sylvania, are interrupted by six-tenths of a mile of gaps. Although used by bikers and walkers alike, the multiuse trail that runs along Sylvania-Metamora Road is not continuous. The Sylvania-Metamora Path’s 2.25 miles between Kilburn and Centennial roads, mostly in Sylvania Township but partly in the city of Sylvania, are interrupted by six-tenths of a mile of gaps.
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Although used by bikers and walkers alike, the multiuse trail that runs along Sylvania-Metamora Road is not continuous.

The Sylvania-Metamora Path’s 2.25 miles between Kilburn and Centennial roads, mostly in Sylvania Township but partly in the city of Sylvania, are interrupted by six-tenths of a mile of gaps.

A joint cooperation agreement among the Lucas County Commissioners, the city of Sylvania, and the Olander Park System has been presented to the three parties to construct a continual path that would hook up with other trails in the city and township.

Mostly built by developers of nearby subdivisions during the 1990s and 2000s to fulfill sidewalk requirements, the path has gaps in undeveloped areas and follows mostly the north side of Sylvania-Metamora — the opposite side from Pacesetter Park, a popular destination for walkers and cyclists. It also connects at Centennial Road to bicycle lanes along Erie Street that lead into downtown Sylvania.

Ron Myers, a representative of the Lucas County Engineer’s Office, said unsafe pedestrian and bicycle access to the park and Centennial Terrace is the subject of recurring complaints from subdivision residents.

“With our project we are proposing to put in a crossing on Sylvania-Metamora at the entrance of Pacesetter Park, with rapid rectangular flashing beacons,” said Mr. Myers, the project’s manager.

The lights would be push-button activated. The project also would complete bicycle/​foot paths on both sides of Sylvania-Metamora.

The Toledo Metropolitan Area Council of Governments has awarded a federal Transportation Alternatives Fund grant that covers 80 percent of the project’s $328,000 estimated construction cost, with total expenses figured at $473,000. The county engineer’s office is contributing staff time for engineering and construction inspection costs, Mr. Myers noted.

Construction is scheduled for 2016. The tentative agreement assigns the Olander system about 14 percent of the project’s construction and inspection costs, while the city would contribute about 2 percent for construction and right-of-way. Lucas County is proposed to contribute 11 percent, also for right-of-way.

Erika Buri, Olander’s interim director, noted that along with improving access to Pacesetter Park, the completed pathway will connect to Olander’s Quarry Ridge Bike Trail and to trails coursing through Centennial Terrace.

“Bike trails help the community stay fit, and it is a huge impact for economic development,” Ms. Buri said.

City officials are also “excited to see another piece of the Sylvania regional bike network in the works,” wrote Joseph Shaw, Sylvania’s deputy director of public service.



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