Sunday, December 21, 2014 - Loading…

Published: Tuesday, 8/26/2014 - Updated: 3 months ago

Sylvania gets $82,000 in state funds to fix erosion problem at Harroun Park

BY NATALIE TRUSSO CAFARELLO
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Erosion along this gravel path at Harroun Park will be fixed with state and local funds. Erosion along this gravel path at Harroun Park will be fixed with state and local funds.
THE BLADE/NATALIE TRUSSO CAFARELLO Enlarge | Buy This Photo

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has awarded Sylvania grants for its bio-retention cell project to combat land erosion at west end of Harroun Community Park off of Main Street.

Kevin Aller, city service director, said it was awarded $82,000 from the state Storm Water Improvement Fund to construct a bio-retention cell that will naturally absorb storm water runoff from the parking lot bordering the park and used by St. Joseph Parish church.

The project cost is $106,000. About $24,000 will be paid by the city and the church, he said.

RELATED CONTENT: Sylvania report on bioretention cell project

To be built is a complex version of a rain garden. It will use soils and plants that naturally absorb water runoff. When consistent heavy downpours occur, the excess water will drain into nearby Ten Mile Creek.

Erosion on the path is show at the edge of Harroun park, near the St. Joseph church parking lot.     Erosion on the path is show at the edge of Harroun park, near the St. Joseph church parking lot.
Enlarge

After a heavy rain, the gravel trail at Harroun Community Park is a bit steeper and lined with six to 12-inch deep crevices, making it difficult on which to bike or run.

For years, Sylvania’s Parks and Forestry Department has tried to fix the land erosion by grading the path, which begins at the park parking lot off of Main Street and slopes between the outdoor amphitheater and the historical Lathrop House. However, the grading was for maintenance and not fixing the core problem.

The bio-retention cell is 130 feet long by 25 feet wide and will be built near the parking lot, at the top of the hill in Harroun Park. A part of the eastern edge of the lot will be removed to make room for the natural stormwater drain.

“The erosion we are seeing on the hill was repeated and extensive,” Mr. Aller said. “We needed to do something. It will solve that problem and will serve as an education piece as a natural method of treatment.”

He said the project will serve as a model for the city’s Parks and Forestry Department and Olander Park System.

The project is open for bidding through 10 a.m. Sept. 10. Construction is expected to begin in the fall, with completion by the end of the year.

Contact Natalie Trusso Cafarello at: 419-206-0356, or ntrusso@theblade.com, or on Twitter @natalietrusso.


Related Attachments:



Guidelines: Please keep your comments smart and civil. Don't attack other readers personally, and keep your language decent. If a comment violates these standards or our privacy statement or visitor's agreement, click the "X" in the upper right corner of the comment box to report abuse. To post comments, you must be a Facebook member. To find out more, please visit the FAQ.

Related stories