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Published: Sunday, 4/14/2013

New recycling containers for Sylvania to be delivered next week

NATALIE TRUSSO CAFARELLO
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Mayor Craig Stough, left, shows one of the old recycling bins, while City Council President Mary Westphal, center, and Council member Sandy Husman, are behind one of the new 65 gallon recycling containers.  Mayor Craig Stough, left, shows one of the old recycling bins, while City Council President Mary Westphal, center, and Council member Sandy Husman, are behind one of the new 65 gallon recycling containers.
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Sylvania officials and Republic Services announced today that the city's new recycling carts are just one of the improvements in the streamlined recycling program that begins April 22.

At a press conference held at the Sylvania Administration Building, Dave Vossmer, general manager of Republic Services in the Toledo area, outlined the city’s recycling program that begins with first automated collection on April 22. The improved program includes placing items in larger, and easy-to-handle recycling carts.

“This was a perfect opportunity to begin the new recycling program on Earth Day,” Mr. Vossmer said.

Distribution of the 95-gallon or 65-gallon, closed-top carts on wheels will take place from Monday to April 20, at no charge to residents for the carts. The carts are replacing the blue open containers. Residents complained that overflowing items in the blue containers, such as newspapers or bags, were being blown away and littering nearby properties, said Mayor Craig Stough.

The recycling plan that city officials negotiated with Republic Services will not have an increased cost because the larger carts on wheels can hold more items, allowing for a bi-weekly pickup schedule. The new carts are also designed for automated lifting.

The automated system calls for fewer trucks in the neighborhood and less wear and tear on city streets, Mr. Stough said.

Officials agreed that since physical handling of the carts is eliminated, the automated system is safer for Republic Services’ employees.

Kevin Aller, city service director, said that the city has not received any complaints about the recycling pickup schedule being reduced to every other week from the previous weekly schedule.

The average household cost for refuse and recycling pick up is $128 per year. About $42 dollars of that goes towards the recycling program.

The city pays  about $730,000 a year to Republic Services for the recycling program. That cost will be maintained throughout the renewed three-year contract that begins in September, Mr. Vossmer said.

Mr. Stough said automated pick-up will be considered for refuse collection which now involves Republic Services employees manually handling trash bins. He stressed that the rubbish and green-yard waste will still be picked up on a weekly basis.

About 80 percent of Sylvania residents recycle.

Mr. Aller said that because the new bins will hold more items, Republic Services and city officials expect residents to recycle more material. As usual, paper, cardboard boxes, plastic bottles, and glass can be mixed in the cart.

Craig McCawley, Republic Services operations manager, suggests that plastic grocery bags be returned to the local Kroger or Meijer store for easier processing.

Residents can turn in the current blue containers beginning on Monday. The city will have a designated collection area in the Administration Building parking lot, 6730 Monroe St.

 Refuse and recycling pickup schedules can be viewed at cityofsylvania.com.

Contact Natalie Trusso Cafarello at: 419-206-0356 or ntrusso@theblade.com. 



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