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Published: Monday, 3/17/2014

Spring Open House Celebration of Creativity at Timberstone Jr. high

BY NATALIE TRUSSO CAFARELLO
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Eighth graders Allison Gehling, left, and Abby Meyers, right, narrate a story at the reader's theater. Eighth graders Allison Gehling, left, and Abby Meyers, right, narrate a story at the reader's theater.
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Timberstone Junior High School students took center stage at the annual Spring Open House Celebration of Creativity.

In its fourth year, the school invited parents of about 600 students that attend the junior high to view pieces of artwork, science projects, math work, and other visible signs of student accomplishment. Parents were treated to musical ensembles and theatrical vignettes performed by students throughout the evening Monday.

“I’m really excited about this. We don’t get to a lot of events here. But I like this one ‘cause I get to see what I’ve done in art and other projects I did earlier in the year," said 14-year-old Ian Mahoney.

He attended the event with his brothers, Daniel, 10, and Aidan, 6, along with his parents Stephanie and Joel.

Art work on display. Art work on display.
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Ian, an eighth-grade student was excited to show off to his family his art project, a tribute to the British landscape artist Joseph Mallord William Turner, born in 1775. He chose to create a portrait of the artist and a flip book about his life because Ian admired the artist's seascape scenes and paintings of ships.

“It’s one of the things that I like to draw,” he said.

Eighth-grade student Savannah Sewell-Conley and her twin sister Sarah saw Savannah’s artwork as part of a larger exhibit on homelessness awareness upon entering the school foyer.

Boxes colored with facts and messages about homelessness were stacked on top of one another. Savannah, 13, said it symbolized that some homeless children take refuge in cardboard boxes. She said the project made her realize how common homelessness and child hunger was.

Jason Bollinger and his son Jaden Bollinger, 9, look over art. Jason Bollinger and his son Jaden Bollinger, 9, look over art.
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Library Media Specialist, Marilyn Waite, who helps organize the event, said it is a celebration of the whole school, showing parents what their children learn here.

Contact Natalie Trusso Cafarello at: 419-206-0356, or ntrusso@theblade.com, or on Twitter @natalietrusso.



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