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Published: Thursday, 3/14/2013

Timberstone celebrates with annual event in appreciation of the arts

NATALIE TRUSSO CAFARELLO
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Brianna Kamelesky, 13, left, took a look at some of her fellow students' artwork with art teacher Jennifer Bucher right, during Wednesday evening's 3rd annual Spring Celebration of the Arts at Timberstone Jr. High School in Sylvania. Brianna Kamelesky, 13, left, took a look at some of her fellow students' artwork with art teacher Jennifer Bucher right, during Wednesday evening's 3rd annual Spring Celebration of the Arts at Timberstone Jr. High School in Sylvania.
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Georgia O’Keeffe’s artistic legacy of up-close flower paintings still inspires young artists in Sylvania.

“She went to New York City, the concrete jungle, and her paintings brought nature to it. She inspired the city with her big flower paintings,” Sylvania resident Brooke Lucarelli, 14, said about one of her favorite American painters.

She choose O’Keeffe as the focus for her biography exhibit that was on display Wednesday evening at the Timberstone Junior High School’s Spring Open House Celebration of Creativity.

PHOTO GALLERY: Spring Celebration of the Arts

Her mother, Kim Lucarelli, keeps Brooke’s artwork on display in their home.

“I have a wall of art,” Mrs. Lucarelli said. “She is always creating something, at home too.”

The school turned into a mini-museum of art, showcasing eighth-grade students' works for parents and visitors who attended the celebration.

“This event makes the children want to do better, and they need creative classes outside of math and social studies,” Mrs. Lucarelli said.

Planned by art teacher Jennifer Bucher and Marilyn Waite, the library media specialist, the yearly event is a memorable way to send off the students before they begin high school. It also shows the community the inspirations behind the next wave of young artists.

“This is an end-of-the-year showcase for the eighth-grade students,” Mrs. Bucher said.

Visitors admired the paintings hung on the entrance wall, including the creation of Sylvania resident Morgan Harmon,14.

“This painting shows lines and action,” Morgan said, describing her close-up action portrait of Pittsburgh Steelers football player Troy Polamalu, which had the athlete running toward the viewer. Using a monochromatic yellow background, Morgan depicted the sports hero in the style of 20th century American painter LeRoy Neiman, who was known for using bold and bright colors.

Near that exhibit were examples of the students’ first forays into color mixing.

From their first projects to the action paintings, they learned how to use shades to create realism, Mrs. Bucher said. Some of the 42 students she taught in painting and art skills came from her former home base of 19 years, before she came to the junior high three years ago.

“My students from Stranahan Elementary feed into here, so it's great to see someone I taught in kindergarten and how they’ve grown,” Mrs. Bucher said.

The showcase also featured other Timberstone programs, including the school's new technology program that received an upgrade with new computers and equipment. The computers and equipment are set up as teaching labs for robotics, computer design, graphics, and lights and lasers.

“The stations allow the students to learn new technology at their own pace,” technology teacher Joe DiMichele said.

A silent auction of student paintings was held to benefit the Sylvania Township Citizen Police Academy.

“Each student had a hand in this painting of tea cups,” Mrs. Bucher said. She thought of the auction as a way to give back to the Sylvania Township Police, who patrol the school daily.

Students from all three Timberstone grades performed in the choir, and musical acts that entertained the families in attendance.

Contact Natalie Trusso Cafarello at: 419-206-0356 or ntrusso@theblade.com.


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